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Whoops! Put that in your pipe and smoke it 😂 USPS all day ✊ 
New York City police took a 106-pound shipment of cannabis off the streets. Soon after they did that, there are questions as to whether the packages were actually legal hemp and not weed.
And the possible mix-up has some Vermont farmers out thousands of dollars.
In the fields in New Haven, hemp farmers are racing to harvest the last of this year’s commercial crop. To get it dried and packaged for the market isn’t easy, and Jahala Dudley, of Fox Holler Farms, said he was pretty happy to get the 106-pound shipment out the door Friday night.
“Everything was fine,” she said. “We’ve done shipments with FedEx before, many times.”
Federal Express in Williston signed off and sent the shipment to Brooklyn, where someone apparently tipped off the NYPD. Officers quickly seized the shipment and arrested the representative for the buyer, a CBD store in New York City.
The police department then posted the news on Facebook and Twitter, congratulating their officers of the 75th Precinct for their relentless effort to keep 106 pounds of weed off city streets. 
According to the farmer, the shipment is all legal, and that they did everything by the books. The farmers said they really tried to do everything the right way.
Hemp strains may look and smell just like cannabis. Growers say every box contained clear documentation and test results showing “undetectable levels of THC.” If the hemp contains less than 0.3% THC it is legal to ship to all 50 states.
An NYPD spokesman said Tuesday he was unaware of any mistake. Now, a shipment worth $17,500 sits in a police warehouse.
“This shipment will make or break the farm this year,” Dudley said. “If this sale goes through, we’re going to be OK. We’re going to break even. If this sale doesn’t go through, we didn’t break even this year.”
Vermont’s Agency of Agriculture is also involved now, trying to help sort out the error. Meantime, the two young farmers wait.
Dudley says a lawyer told her to make one change going forward — switch to the using the U.S. Postal Service.
Whoops! Put that in your pipe and smoke it 😂 USPS all day ✊ New York City police took a 106-pound shipment of cannabis off the streets. Soon after they did that, there are questions as to whether the packages were actually legal hemp and not weed. And the possible mix-up has some Vermont farmers out thousands of dollars. In the fields in New Haven, hemp farmers are racing to harvest the last of this year’s commercial crop. To get it dried and packaged for the market isn’t easy, and Jahala Dudley, of Fox Holler Farms, said he was pretty happy to get the 106-pound shipment out the door Friday night. “Everything was fine,” she said. “We’ve done shipments with FedEx before, many times.” Federal Express in Williston signed off and sent the shipment to Brooklyn, where someone apparently tipped off the NYPD. Officers quickly seized the shipment and arrested the representative for the buyer, a CBD store in New York City. The police department then posted the news on Facebook and Twitter, congratulating their officers of the 75th Precinct for their relentless effort to keep 106 pounds of weed off city streets. According to the farmer, the shipment is all legal, and that they did everything by the books. The farmers said they really tried to do everything the right way. Hemp strains may look and smell just like cannabis. Growers say every box contained clear documentation and test results showing “undetectable levels of THC.” If the hemp contains less than 0.3% THC it is legal to ship to all 50 states. An NYPD spokesman said Tuesday he was unaware of any mistake. Now, a shipment worth $17,500 sits in a police warehouse. “This shipment will make or break the farm this year,” Dudley said. “If this sale goes through, we’re going to be OK. We’re going to break even. If this sale doesn’t go through, we didn’t break even this year.” Vermont’s Agency of Agriculture is also involved now, trying to help sort out the error. Meantime, the two young farmers wait. Dudley says a lawyer told her to make one change going forward — switch to the using the U.S. Postal Service.
Take that Indiana and any other state that tries to ban a legal product! Hemp, Hemp, Hooray!!! A ban on smokable hemp in the U.S. state of Indiana has been ruled unconstitutional in federal courts, and could lead to challenges against bans in other states. 
Judge Sarah Evans Barker of the U.S. Court’s Southern District of Indiana, ruled the state’s ban, which prohibits the manufacturing, financing, delivery, and possession of smokable hemp, violates federal law. The judge issued a preliminary injunction blocking enforcement of the statute so those who brought the lawsuit can continue to sell their products.

Other state bans

The popularity of smokable hemp — or “nobacco” — led Indiana and other states to ban such products, arguing that law enforcement cannot easily tell if a substance is hemp or marijuana. Louisiana and Texas have banned smokable forms of hemp while North Carolina is considering doing so. Tennessee has blocked its sale to minors. “The fact that local law enforcement may need to adjust tactics and training in response to changes in federal law is not a sufficient basis for enacting unconstitutional legislation,” Barker noted in the ruling. Federal law changed when the 2018 Farm Bill made hemp legal across the United States late last year.

Hemp’s ‘novelty’

The judge’s injunction blocking the law’s enforcement was issued so that the companies who filed suit against the State need not wait to determine how much business was lost in order to file a lawsuit later for financial damages. “The likely unconstitutional portions of the statute cannot be easily measured or reliably calculated, given the novelty of the hemp industry in Indiana and the dearth of historical sales data to use as a baseline for calculating lost revenues,” Barker ruled. ‘Nobacco’ products started showing up in shops in Switzerland in early 2017, and since then have spread to other countries across Europe.
Take that Indiana and any other state that tries to ban a legal product! Hemp, Hemp, Hooray!!! A ban on smokable hemp in the U.S. state of Indiana has been ruled unconstitutional in federal courts, and could lead to challenges against bans in other states. Judge Sarah Evans Barker of the U.S. Court’s Southern District of Indiana, ruled the state’s ban, which prohibits the manufacturing, financing, delivery, and possession of smokable hemp, violates federal law. The judge issued a preliminary injunction blocking enforcement of the statute so those who brought the lawsuit can continue to sell their products. Other state bans The popularity of smokable hemp — or “nobacco” — led Indiana and other states to ban such products, arguing that law enforcement cannot easily tell if a substance is hemp or marijuana. Louisiana and Texas have banned smokable forms of hemp while North Carolina is considering doing so. Tennessee has blocked its sale to minors. “The fact that local law enforcement may need to adjust tactics and training in response to changes in federal law is not a sufficient basis for enacting unconstitutional legislation,” Barker noted in the ruling. Federal law changed when the 2018 Farm Bill made hemp legal across the United States late last year. Hemp’s ‘novelty’ The judge’s injunction blocking the law’s enforcement was issued so that the companies who filed suit against the State need not wait to determine how much business was lost in order to file a lawsuit later for financial damages. “The likely unconstitutional portions of the statute cannot be easily measured or reliably calculated, given the novelty of the hemp industry in Indiana and the dearth of historical sales data to use as a baseline for calculating lost revenues,” Barker ruled. ‘Nobacco’ products started showing up in shops in Switzerland in early 2017, and since then have spread to other countries across Europe.