Haha! ๐Ÿ˜ญ ๐Ÿ˜‚ 
By Amber Stegall | January 2, 2020 at 3:23 PM CST - Updated January 2 at 4:19 PM
AMARILLO, Texas (KCBD) - One month after a truck driver was arrested and charged for what Texas Department of Public Safety Troopers said was more than 3,000 pounds of marijuana, the case has been dismissed and the driver is suing.
On Dec. 5, 2019, Texas Highway Patrol reported seizing 3.350 pounds of suspected marijuana in boxes which were in the cargo area of the U-Haul. The truck was pulled over for a traffic violation in Carson County near Conway. Today, nearly one month later, a federal court has dismissed the case and have ordered the driver, 39-year-old Aneudy Gonzalez, to be released from jail in Amarillo. It turns out, the load was thousands of pounds of hemp, not marijuana.
More than 3,000 pounds of marijuana was found during a traffic stop in Carson County. (Source: Texas DPS)
More than 3,000 pounds of marijuana was found during a traffic stop in Carson County. (Source: Texas DPS) (Source: Texas DPS)
Court documents say Gonzalez was also stopped by police in Arizona but was let go when they determined the load to be legal hemp.
Gonzalezโ€™s attorney released the following statement:

Today we beat the Feds. Our client was indicted in the Northern District of Texas, Amarillo division on a violation of 21 U.S.C. ยงยง 841(a)(1), 841(b)(1)(A)(vii) - POSSESSION WITH INTENT TO DISTRIBUTE 1000 KILOGRAMS OR MORE OF MARIHUANA following this stop. We maintained from the word go that all he had was hemp and this morning the US Government moved to dismiss the charges against our client. We will now be seeking the return of property and just compensation for our client losing a month of his life in the custody of the US Marshals.
Gonzalez is expected to be released from the Randall County jail soon and will be reunited with his family in New York.
Haha! ๐Ÿ˜ญ ๐Ÿ˜‚ By Amber Stegall | January 2, 2020 at 3:23 PM CST - Updated January 2 at 4:19 PM AMARILLO, Texas (KCBD) - One month after a truck driver was arrested and charged for what Texas Department of Public Safety Troopers said was more than 3,000 pounds of marijuana, the case has been dismissed and the driver is suing. On Dec. 5, 2019, Texas Highway Patrol reported seizing 3.350 pounds of suspected marijuana in boxes which were in the cargo area of the U-Haul. The truck was pulled over for a traffic violation in Carson County near Conway. Today, nearly one month later, a federal court has dismissed the case and have ordered the driver, 39-year-old Aneudy Gonzalez, to be released from jail in Amarillo. It turns out, the load was thousands of pounds of hemp, not marijuana. More than 3,000 pounds of marijuana was found during a traffic stop in Carson County. (Source: Texas DPS) More than 3,000 pounds of marijuana was found during a traffic stop in Carson County. (Source: Texas DPS) (Source: Texas DPS) Court documents say Gonzalez was also stopped by police in Arizona but was let go when they determined the load to be legal hemp. Gonzalezโ€™s attorney released the following statement: Today we beat the Feds. Our client was indicted in the Northern District of Texas, Amarillo division on a violation of 21 U.S.C. ยงยง 841(a)(1), 841(b)(1)(A)(vii) - POSSESSION WITH INTENT TO DISTRIBUTE 1000 KILOGRAMS OR MORE OF MARIHUANA following this stop. We maintained from the word go that all he had was hemp and this morning the US Government moved to dismiss the charges against our client. We will now be seeking the return of property and just compensation for our client losing a month of his life in the custody of the US Marshals. Gonzalez is expected to be released from the Randall County jail soon and will be reunited with his family in New York.
Can someone tell this to our bank? ๐Ÿ˜‚ it will get easier they say, yes, it will, one day. We are one step closer. 
The number of banks in the United States willing to lend to hemp producers can be counted on one hand. That is about to change.

Federal and state bank regulators announced Tuesday that they were scrapping a burdensome requirement that banks said kept them away from the hemp business. Banks will no longer have to treat their hemp customers as suspicious and file reams of paperwork to anti-money-laundering authorities for each interaction.

The change could provide a major boost to a niche product that began its own legalization process last year. โ€œBanking has been an ongoing problem,โ€ said Erica McBride Stark, the executive director of the National Hemp Association, a trade group for growers. โ€œSo this actually should be quite helpful.โ€
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Continue reading the main story

Hemp products are made from the same plants that produce marijuana, but they are cultivated to have far less tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the chemical that produces a โ€œhighโ€ when ingested. The plantsโ€™ stalks can be woven into fabric and their seeds processed into oils used in food, but they cannot be made into drugs.

Even so, federal law long considered hemp to be as forbidden as cocaine and heroin. But with the legalization of marijuana spreading across the country โ€” 33 states have legalized the drug for medical use and 11 states will allow sales for recreational use by January โ€” lawmakers in Washington decided to do away with the designation for its milder sibling.

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Last year Congress legalized hemp as a crop and directed the Agriculture Department to start regulating hemp production. It took the agency almost a year to devise rules for the industry, but once they were released, on Oct. 31, bank regulators prepared to take action. Tuesdayโ€™s statement, from the Federal Reserve, the Federal Deposit Insurance Company and other state and federal regulators, informs banks that they can now treat hemp producers like other customers, as long as the companies can prove theyโ€™re following licensing requirements.
HEMP Pol
Can someone tell this to our bank? ๐Ÿ˜‚ it will get easier they say, yes, it will, one day. We are one step closer. The number of banks in the United States willing to lend to hemp producers can be counted on one hand. That is about to change. Federal and state bank regulators announced Tuesday that they were scrapping a burdensome requirement that banks said kept them away from the hemp business. Banks will no longer have to treat their hemp customers as suspicious and file reams of paperwork to anti-money-laundering authorities for each interaction. The change could provide a major boost to a niche product that began its own legalization process last year. โ€œBanking has been an ongoing problem,โ€ said Erica McBride Stark, the executive director of the National Hemp Association, a trade group for growers. โ€œSo this actually should be quite helpful.โ€ ADVERTISEMENT Continue reading the main story Hemp products are made from the same plants that produce marijuana, but they are cultivated to have far less tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the chemical that produces a โ€œhighโ€ when ingested. The plantsโ€™ stalks can be woven into fabric and their seeds processed into oils used in food, but they cannot be made into drugs. Even so, federal law long considered hemp to be as forbidden as cocaine and heroin. But with the legalization of marijuana spreading across the country โ€” 33 states have legalized the drug for medical use and 11 states will allow sales for recreational use by January โ€” lawmakers in Washington decided to do away with the designation for its milder sibling. Unlock more free articles. Create an account or log in Last year Congress legalized hemp as a crop and directed the Agriculture Department to start regulating hemp production. It took the agency almost a year to devise rules for the industry, but once they were released, on Oct. 31, bank regulators prepared to take action. Tuesdayโ€™s statement, from the Federal Reserve, the Federal Deposit Insurance Company and other state and federal regulators, informs banks that they can now treat hemp producers like other customers, as long as the companies can prove theyโ€™re following licensing requirements. HEMP Pol